Saturday, March 23, 2013

Detroit Urbana, Part two



Detroit continues.

Even if an Emergency Manager has been brought in and there are persistent rumours of the city declaring bankruptcy. 
















I was literally overwhelmed by all of your comments regarding my previous post in this series.  How to begin to respond? I admit, I felt defeated in the face of something I am grappling to understand but it would seem that the people of Detroit aren't down for the count just yet. 


*Update: I am really thrilled to be working with the amazing D. A. Wolf again today on her fantastic blog, Daily Plate of Crazy. So if you are looking for a Provence fix, you can find it here!*

22 comments:

  1. This looks like a depressing post. Why is it that all these buildings are abandoned and neglected?


    Very nice pictures!

    Greetings from the Netherlands,
    DzjieDzjee

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  2. It's a shame that we have organizations to step in and help broken and abused and abandoned animals and people, yet we have no safety net for cities.

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    1. Especially one that did so much to advance the US economy previously, Jackie. I hear you.

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  3. We ignore urban blight, pretending it doesn't exist, and likewise, those for whom this is the "neighborhood."

    Striking images, Heather.

    (Et merci encore pour tes mots et tes images aujourd'hui.)

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    1. Thank you as always. Yep, this is reality for these folks.

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  4. Replies
    1. But yet there are areas that are moving forward and a good arts scene from what I understand. It definitely isn't abandoned, just struggling ma chere Contessa.

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  5. What are your ties to Detroit or Michigan Heather? I grew up in Michigan, although on the other side of the state from Detroit but Detroit and it's sports teams are near and dear to my heart. A very sad state of affairs there in Detroit. Your pictures are sobering.

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    1. Hello, Michel--I spent part of my childhood in Mason, MI (just outside of Lansing) and now my Mom and Sis live in Ann Arbor, so I go to visit them as often as I can (aka not often enough!). These photos were taken during my last trip back.

      And I couldn't agree with you more. A very sad and frustrating situation.

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  6. A lot of people seem to be depressed seeing urban blight but I'm seeing great potential and a lot of beauty. People need a reason to stay, find a reason.

    XXX
    Debra~

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    1. Remi had a similar reaction and I agree with you too Debra. It is just especially challenging as there are so many destroyed homes next to lived in ones...it creates a dangerous situation.

      Bisous to you and scratchies to DD,
      H

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  7. The State actually took over Detroit! Such a sad tale of corruption.My best friend is from Detroit an shes has more stories to tell... Your pics are a beautiful testimony to what this city could be, America needs to support manufacturing and get back on its feet.

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    1. I definitely agree with you Francine. The jobs have to come back to the US.

      And I can only imagine your friend's stories...It is scary that even the Emergency Manager is possibly corrupt as well...

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  8. I think of the Dark Age travelers in England and the continent who would come upon towns and villages emptied by the plague; we're in another dark age I suppose. This is about change on so many levels.
    XXXX
    G

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    1. Absolutely, G and so well put, as always. But for me, these photos are not about the past but about a possible future for all of us. And that scares me as much as a possible plague.
      Bisous...

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  9. It almost already looks like it is a ghost town.

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    1. Not all of it, which somehow saddens me the most. Although I think there was a proposed plan at one point to raze the worst areas to turn them into parks and it was nearly 25% of the inner city land...

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  10. A brilliant post.

    Because behind the devastation and pubs and church halls there are writers and painters and musicians and all sorts of magic.

    We can feel it

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  11. It looks so sad. So sad and forlorn.

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  12. Leslie in Portland, OregonMarch 28, 2013 at 3:24 AM

    Your Detroit photographs, and your fear that your fear they are about "a possible future for all of us," prompt me to learn much more about why this has happened in and to Detroit. Start me out with some comments on that, S.V.P.! And thank you, as always, for your consciousness-raising. With admiration and appreciation, Leslie

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  13. It is a very sad "state of affairs" the Detroit of today. Unfortunately, there are many cities and small towns that are suffering equally. The American economy does not seem to match the glowing reports out of washington about job growth, etc. Even here in 'wealthy' Southern California, almost everyone I know has been affected drastically by the lack of business in all sectors. There are for lease signs on every block, everyone of them a viable business until about 4 years ago. My heart bleeds for the millions who have lost everything. Many cities and states are on the verge of bankruptcy with no light at the end of the tunnel.
    I pray, the only way is up; opportunity, manufacturing, training, hiring, sales and a real turn-around.
    Thank you, Heather, for sharing these sad icons of the American dream that have disintegrated into the American nightmare. I pray for my fellow Americans and the country I love with all my heart.
    xoxo, Chris

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